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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 6-9

The role of antibiotics in treating secretory otitis media in children aged 2–12 years in an accredited teaching hospital in southeast Asia


1 Department of Otorhinolaryngology, MGIMS, Sevagram, Wardha, Maharashtra, India
2 Department of Biochemistry, Mahaveer Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India
3 Department of Medicine, Mahaveer Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India
4 Department of Pharmacology, IMS & SUM Hospital, SOA University, Bhubaneswar, Orissa, India
5 Department of Pharmacology, Mahaveer Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Sarmishtha De
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Mahaveer Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/aaaj.aaaj_1_17

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Introduction Secretory otitis media (SOM) is the most common clinical condition that can cause conductive deafness, especially among school-going children. The outcomes of hearing loss in children include speech problems, behavioral problems, and poor academic performance. Management of SOM therefore remains crucial. We carried out a comparative study of antibiotics versus surgical therapy for the treatment of SOM. Patients and methods The present study included 50 patients. Detailed history taking with ENT examinations was performed and documented in a validated pro forma. Routine investigations such as complete blood count, urine examination, audiological investigation such as impedance audiometry, etc, were carried out. Observation and results About 70% of the patients presented with symptoms of ear block with mouth breathing. Increased incidence was found in the 2–6 years age group. The present showed that surgery can increase the rate of recovery, shorten the duration of therapy, and prevent the recurrence of SOM compared with treatment with antibiotics. Conclusion Both the treatments have complications associated with them. Large, well-controlled studies can help resolve the risk–benefit ratio by measuring SOM recurrence, functional outcome, quality of life, and long-term outcomes.


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